Monday, September 18, 2017

Jim Rickards: The Next Financial Crisis Is Six to Eight Months Away

In this excellent video presentation, Jim Rickards tell's us that It is inevitable the next financial crises is six to eight months away and it will be triggered by a war between the US and North Korea. He still say's one of the best way to protect your wealth preservation is through gold.

Click on the image to view Rickards presentation;





Friday, September 15, 2017

Jim Rickards on How the North Korean Endgame Is Playing out Now


As mounting tensions rise from the latest round of nuclear testing out of North Korea, Jim Rickards believes a considerable window is closing by the United States. The threat of a nuclear armed and capable North Korea is a line that the currency wars expert and macro analyst believes the United States will now allow to be crossed. Speaking on CNBC’s Capital Connection Rickards offered his latest critique of the restrictions and response by the international community on North Korea.

The interview began with a question what an oil embargo would mean for North Korea and how it would impact that country. Rickards blasts, “North Korea has already beaten the world to the punch. They’ve been building up their strategic oil reserves. What that means is they have an estimated year’s worth of held in reserve and China has played a role in these things in the past.”


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Weird Things Happening In Gold, Expert Sounds the Alarm


Two unusual stories are unfolding for gold — one strange and the other truly weird, this according to bestselling author Jim Rickards. "These stories explain why gold is not just money but is the most politicized form of money," Rickards, the author of Currency Wars said on Wednesday. 

"They show that while politicians publicly disparage gold, they quietly pay close attention to it," Rickards said. The first strange gold story involves Germany and its repatriation of its gold from New York and Paris, Rickards explained how this move was much more political than anything. The second weird event for Rickards is Treasury Secretary, Steve Mnuchin's visit to Fort Knox. After Mnuchin tweeted that all $200 billion dollars worth of gold is still there, Rickards said a few red flags went up for him. 

"Mnuchin is only the third Treasury secretary in history ever to visit Fort Knox and this was the first official visit from Washington, D.C., since 1974. The U.S. government likes to ignore gold and not draw attention to it. So why an impromptu visit by Mnuchin."


Saturday, September 9, 2017

It Won’t Be A Parabolic Rise But $10,000 Gold Is Coming


After hitting its highest level this year, gold has fallen back on profit taking, but best-selling author of Currency Wars Jim Rickards isn’t giving up on the metal just yet. ‘The bigger picture, the one I’m looking at, is that gold hit an interim low on Dec 15 and it’s been grinding higher ever since. 

It’s one of the best performing assets of 2017,’ he told Kitco News. Gold prices rallied to 11-month highs this week as North Korea launched a missile over Japan and even if tensions seem to have cooled off, pushing the safe-haven metal back down to around $1,312.70 an ounce, Rickards is not quite convinced. ‘People seem to have very short attention spans. I’m just looking down the road and you can see the war is coming,’ he said.

- Source, Kitco

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Jim Rickards Warns - How Gold Regulation Could Come


James Rickards is interviewed and talks about how the system could crack down on gold and what gold regulation really means.


Sunday, September 3, 2017

EXPOSED: The Elite’s Plan to Freeze the Financial System

Today’s complacent markets are faced with a number of potentially destabilizing shocks.

Any one of them could potentially lead to another financial crisis. And the next crisis could see draconian measures by governments that most people are not prepared for today.

You’ll see what I mean in a moment.

But first, what are the catalysts that possibly trigger the next financial crisis?

First off, a debt ceiling crisis is just over a month away. If the ceiling isn’t raised by Sept. 29, the federal government is likely to default on at least some of its bills.

If a deal isn’t reached, it could rock markets and possibly trigger a major recession.

Given Washington’s current political paralysis and intense partisan infighting surrounding President Trump, it’s far from certain that a deal will be reached.

Second, despite some official comments over the weekend downplaying the odds of a war with North Korea, a shooting war remains a very real possibility.

North Korea’s Kim is determined to acquire nuclear weapons that can threaten the lower 48 U.S. states, and Trump is equally determined to prevent that from happening.

Third, a trade war between the U.S. and China seems imminent.

Trump has backed off his campaign pledges to label China a currency manipulator and an unequal trading partner.

And today, Trump is expected to present his case for sanctions against China.

China would likely retaliate, and that could ultimately result in a 10–20% “maxi-devaluation” of the yuan, perhaps by early next year.

That would likely cause a stock market rout. Since China devalued in August 2015, markets fell hundreds of points in single sessions. And that was a much smaller devaluation, less than 2%.

And if markets collapse from either of these scenarios — which is entirely possible — governments will move dramatically to contain the damage.

In my book The Road to Ruin, I discuss a phenomenon called “ice-nine.” The name is taken from a novel, Cat’s Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut.

In the novel, a scientist invents a molecule he calls ice-nine, which is like water but with two differences. The melting temperature is 114.4 degrees Fahrenheit (meaning it’s frozen at room temperature), and whenever ice-nine comes in contact with water, the water turns to ice-nine and freezes.

The ice-nine is kept in three vials. The plot revolves around the potential release of ice-nine into water, which would eventually freeze the rivers and oceans and end all life on Earth. Cat’s Cradle is darkly comedic, and I highly recommend it.

I used ice-nine in my book as a metaphor for financial contagion.

If regulators freeze money market funds in a crisis, depositors will take money from banks. The regulators will then close the banks, but investors will sell stocks and force the exchanges to close and so on.

Eventually, the entire financial system will be frozen solid and investors will have no access to their money.

Some of my readers were skeptical of this scenario. But I researched it carefully and provided solid evidence that this plan is already in place — it’s just not well understood. But the ice-nine plan is now being put into practice.

Consider a recent Reuters article that admitted elites would likely shut down the entire system when the next financial crisis strikes.

The article claimed that the EU is considering actions that would temporarily prevent people from withdrawing money from banks to prevent bank runs.

“The desire is to prevent a bank run, so that when a bank is in a critical situation it is not pushed over the edge,” said one source.

Very few people are aware of these developments. They get a brief mention in the media, if they get mentioned at all. But people could be in for a shock when they try to get their money out of the bank during the next financial crisis.

Think of it as a war on currency or a war on money. Even the skeptics can see how the entire financial system will be frozen solid in the next crisis.

The only solution is to have physical gold, silver and bank notes in private storage. The sooner you put your personal ice-nine protection plan in place, the safer you’ll be.

- Source, James Rickards via the Daily Reckoning

Thursday, August 31, 2017

The Coming Gold “Break Out”

Gold has conducted what some are calling a “stealth rally” over the past month.

After bottoming at $1,206 per ounce on July 10, gold is at $1,286 this morning, a healthy 6.5% gain in just over one month.

The has been welcome relief for gold investors after a series of “flash crashes” on June 14, June 26 and July 3 contributed to a gold drawdown from $1,294 per ounce to $1,206 per ounce between June 6 and July 10. At that point it looked as though gold might fall through technical resistance and tumble to the $1,150 per ounce range.

But the new rally restored the upward momentum in gold we have seen since the post-election low on Dec. 15, 2016. Gold seems poised to resume its march to $1,300 after the paper gold bear raids of late June.

The physical fundamentals are stronger than ever for gold. Russia and China continue to be huge buyers. China bans export of its 450 tons per year of physical production.

Gold refiners are working around the clock and cannot meet demand. Gold refiners are also having difficulty finding gold to refine as mining output, official bullion sales and scrap inflows all remain weak.

Private bullion continues to migrate from bank vaults at UBS and Credit Suisse into nonbank vaults at Brinks and Loomis, thus reducing the floating supply available for bank unallocated gold sales.

In other words, the physical supply situation is tight as a drum.

The problem, of course, is unlimited selling in “paper” gold markets such as the Comex gold futures and similar instruments.

One of the flash crashes was precipitated by the instantaneous sale of gold futures contracts equal in underlying amount to 60 tons of physical gold. The largest bullion banks in the world could not source 60 tons of physical gold if they had months to do it.

There’s just not that much gold available. But in the paper gold market, there’s no limit on size, so anything goes.

There’s no sense complaining about this situation. It is what it is, and it won’t be broken up anytime soon. The main source of comfort is knowing that fundamentals always win in the long run even if there are temporary reversals. What you need to do is be patient, stay the course and buy strategically when the drawdowns emerge.

Where do we go from here?

August and September are traditionally strong seasonal periods for gold. This is partly due to proximity to the wedding and gift season in India, when strong buying prevails.

Yet there’s more to the gold demand story this year.

Deteriorating relations between the U.S. and Russia will only accelerate Russia’s efforts to diversify its reserves away from dollar assets (which can be frozen by the U.S. on a moment’s notice) to gold assets, which are immune to asset freezes and seizures.

The countdown to war with North Korea has begun. A U.S. attack on the North Korean nuclear and missile weapons programs is likely by mid-2018. The stock market may not have noticed, but the gold market has. This is part of the reason for recent gold strength.

Finally, we have to deal with our friends at the Fed. The strong jobs report on Friday, Aug. 4, gave life to the view that the Fed would raise interest rates at least one more time this year. Rate hikes make the dollar stronger and are a head wind for the dollar price of gold.

But the Fed will not hike rates again this year. Once the market wakes up to the reality of a prolonged “pause” by the Fed, they will conclude correctly that the Fed is once again attempting to ease by “forward guidance.” This relative ease will keep the dollar on its downward trend and be a boost to the dollar price of gold.

The Fed will not hike rates regardless of the strong jobs report. The reason is that strong job growth was “mission accomplished” for the Fed over a year ago. Jobs are not the determining factor in Fed rate decisions today. The determining factor is disinflation.

The Fed’s main inflation metric has been moving in the wrong direction since January. The readings on the core PCE deflator year over year (the Fed’s preferred metric) were:

January 1.9%
February 1.9%
March 1.6%
April 1.6%
May 1.5%
June 1.5%

The July data will not be available until early September.

The Fed’s target rate for this metric is 2%. It will take a sustained increase over several months for the Fed to conclude that inflation is back on track to meet the Fed’s goal.

There’s no chance of this happening before the Fed’s September meeting. It’s unlikely to happen before December, because of weakness in auto sales, retail sales, discretionary spending and consumer credit.

A weak dollar is the Fed’s only chance for more inflation. The way to get a weak dollar is to delay rate hikes indefinitely, and that’s what the Fed will do.

And a weak dollar means a higher dollar price for gold.

Current levels look like the last stop before $1,300 per ounce gold. After that, a price surge is likely as buyers jump on the bandwagon, and then it’s up, up and away.

There’s an old saying that “a picture is worth a thousand words.” This chart is a good example of why that’s true:


Gold analyst Eddie Van Der Walt produced this 10-year chart for the dollar price of gold showing that gold prices have been converging into a narrow tunnel between two price trends — one trending higher and one lower — for the past six years.

This pattern has been especially pronounced since 2015. You can see gold has traded up and down in a range between $1,050 and $1,380 per ounce. The upper trend line and the lower trend line converge into a funnel.

Since gold will not remain in that funnel much longer (because it converges to a fixed price) gold will likely “break out” to the upside or downside, typically with a huge move that disrupts the pattern.

At the extreme, this could imply a gold price on its way to $1,800 or $800 per ounce. Which will it be?

The evidence overwhelmingly supports the thesis that gold will break out to the upside. Central banks are determined to get more inflation and will flip to easing policies if that’s what it takes.

Geopolitical risks are piling up from North Korea, to Syria, to the South China Sea and beyond.

The failure of the Trump agenda has put the stock market on edge and a substantial market correction may be in the cards.

Acute shortages of physical gold have set the stage for a delivery failure or a short squeeze.

Any one of these developments is enough to send gold soaring in response to a panic or as part of a flight to quality. The only force that could take gold lower is deflation, and that is the one thing central banks will never allow. The above chart is one of the most powerful bullish indicators I’ve ever seen.

Get ready for an explosion to the upside in the dollar price of gold. Make sure you have your physical gold and gold mining shares before the breakout begins.

- Source, James Rickards

Monday, August 28, 2017

How Badly Does China Want Gold?


In best-selling author Jim Rickards’ latest book, the New Case For Gold, he brings up one of the most common criticisms of a new gold standard – that there is not enough gold to support it. 

Rickards makes the argument that it would work at a certain price level. In his interview with Kitco News, Rickards also discusses China and gold buying. He suggests that China is suppressing the gold price through the COMEX market in order to build-up more physical supplies. 

Once they have a sufficient supply, equal to the United States, they will no longer care what the metal's price is and it will likely skyrocket, he explains.


Friday, August 25, 2017

Bitcoin No Threat To U.S. Dollar, Gold - Jim Rickards


The cryptocurrency craze continues with the leading virtual currency — Bitcoin — trading near record highs. But, to bestselling author and currency expert Jim Rickards, the new age currency may be in a bubble. 

Delving into the theory of valuation, the Currency Wars author said that even if investors seem to be expressing a liquidity preference for Bitcoin over the dollar, it doesn’t necessarily mean they are losing confidence in the greenback. ‘If you were losing confidence in the dollar than gold would be going up and it’s not, so it looks like a bubble,’ he told Kitco News. 

He added that investors should not worry that virtual currencies take over the U.S. dollar’s reserve currency status any time soon because the market is just too small. Another facet that investors may be ignoring, Rickards continued, is that investors racking up substantial gains from crypto investments might not be properly filing their taxes. “The IRS could subpoena one of these [cryptocurrency] exchanges and freeze up all the bitcoin,’ he said. ‘The IRS did this with Americans with Swiss bank accounts, they’ll do it with bitcoin.’

- Source, Kitco News

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Why Elites Are Winning the War on Cash

Visa recently unveiled its own offensive in the war on cash. Visa is offering certain merchants a $10,000 reward if they refuse to accept cash in the future.

Not surprisingly, Visa’s competitor is also part of the war on cash. Mastercard is increasing its efforts to encourage merchants to refuse cash. Here’s Bloomberg, quoting the CEO of Mastercard:

“Mastercard Chief Executive Officer Ajay Banga has been one of the most ardent supporters of ditching paper currency in the U.S. The 57-year-old first declared his war on cash in 2010.”

These private efforts by Visa and MasterCard exist side by side with official efforts to eliminate or discourage the use of cash coming from governments in India, Australia, Sweden as well as the United States.

These efforts are always portrayed in the most favorable light. Private parties talk about convenience and lower costs. Governments talk about putting pressure on tax cheats, terrorists and criminals.

Governments always use money laundering, drug dealing and terrorism as an excuse to keep tabs on honest citizens and deprive them of the ability to use money alternatives such as physical cash and gold.

But the so-called “cashless society” is just a Trojan horse for a system in which all financial wealth is electronic and represented digitally in the records of a small number of megabanks and asset managers.

Once that is achieved, it will be easy for state power to seize and freeze the wealth, or subject it to constant surveillance, taxation and other forms of digital confiscation.

The war on cash has two main thrusts. The first is to make it difficult to obtain cash in the first place. U.S. banks will report anyone taking more than $3,000 in cash as engaging in a “suspicious activity” using Treasury Form SAR (Suspicious Activity Report).

The second thrust is to eliminate large-denomination banknotes. The U.S. got rid of its $500 note in 1969, and the $100 note has lost 85% of its purchasing power since then. With a little more inflation, the $100 bill will be reduced to chump change.

Last year the European Central Bank announced that they were discontinuing the production of new 500 euro notes. Existing 500 euro notes will still be legal tender, but new ones will not be produced.

This means that over time, the notes will be in short supply and individuals in need of large denominations may actually bid up the price above face value paying, say, 502 euros in smaller bills for a 500 euro note. The 2 euro premium in this example is like a negative interest rate on cash.

The real burden of the war on cash falls on honest citizens who are made vulnerable to wealth confiscation through negative interest rates, loss of privacy, account freezes and limits on cash withdrawals or transfers.

The whole idea of the war on cash is to force savers into digital bank accounts so their money can be taken from them in the form of negative interest rates. An easy solution to this is to go to physical cash.

The war on cash is a global effort being waged on many fronts. My view is that the war on cash is dangerous in terms of lost privacy and the risk of government confiscation of wealth. India provides the most dramatic example.

How would you like to go to bed one night and then wake up the next morning to discover that all bills larger than $5.00 were no longer legal tender? That’s essentially what happened in India not long ago.

The good news is that cash is still a dominant form of payment in many countries including the U.S. The problem is that as digital payments grow and the use of cash diminishes, a “tipping point” is reached where suddenly it makes no sense to continue using cash because of the expense and logistics involved.

Once cash usage shrinks to a certain point, economies of scale are lost and usage can go to zero almost overnight. Remember how music CDs disappeared suddenly once MP3 and streaming formats became popular?

That’s how fast cash can disappear.

Once the war on cash gains that kind of momentum, it will be practically impossible to stop. That’s why I’m always saying that savers and those with a long-term view should get physical gold now while prices are still attractive and while they still can.

Given these potential outcomes, one might expect that citizens would push back against the war on cash.

But in some places, the opposite seems to be happening.

A recent survey revealed that more than a third of Americans and Europeans would have no problem at all giving up cash and going completely digital.

Specifically, the study showed 34% of Europeans and 38% of Americans surveyed would prefer going cashless.

Notably, Germans are the most resistant to going cashless. Almost 80% of transactions in Germany are done in cash, and many Germans never use credit cards.

The German experience with hyperinflation after WWI and additional monetary chaos after WWII certainly plays a part in this resistance to the cashless society.

Incidentally, the German word for debt, schuld, also means guilt.

Other countries, such as Romania and Bulgaria, which have recent experiences with currency and financial crises, also tend to use cash extensively.

Of course, there’s no denying that digital payments are certainly convenient. I use them myself in the form of credit and debit cards, wire transfers, automatic deposits and bill payments.

The surest way to lull someone into complacency is to offer a “convenience” that quickly becomes habit and impossible to do without.

The convenience factor is becoming more prevalent, and consumers are moving from cash to digital payments just as they moved from gold and silver coins to paper money a hundred years ago.

But when the next financial panic comes, those without tangible wealth will be totally at the mercy of banks and governments who will decide exactly how much of your own money you’re allowed to have each day.

Just ask the citizens of Cyprus, Greece and India who have gone through this experience in recent years.

It will come to the U.S. soon enough.

Other dangers arise from the fact that digital money, transferred by credit or debit cards or other electronic payments systems, are completely dependent on the power grid. If the power grid goes out due to storms, accidents, sabotage or cyberattacks, our digital economy will grind to a complete halt.

That’s why it’s a good idea to keep some of your liquidity in paper cash (while you can) and gold or silver coins. The gold and silver coins in particular will be money good in every state of the world.

I hold significant portion of my wealth in nondigital form, including real estate, fine art and precious metals in safe, nonbank storage.

I strongly suggest you do the same.

- Source, The Daily Reckoning via Jim Rickards

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Jim Rickards: Thoughts on the US Economy, Section 232 and the Gold Price


Jim Rickards chats about his latest book, the potential for future interest rate hikes and US President Donald Trump's steel probe. He also shares his advice for investors.

- Source, Investing News

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Gold prices have nowhere to go but up: Jim Rickards

Gold prices have nowhere to go but up: Jim Rickards from CNBC.

Gold prices stand to benefit as central banks continue targeting higher inflation rates, says Strategic Intelligence's Jim Rickards.

- Source, CNBC